plants

The Latest

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN
Aug 27, 2013 / 397 notes

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN

(via flowerfood)

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 
Aug 26, 2013 / 206 notes

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 

(via mamisgarden)

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa
Aug 26, 2013 / 3,139 notes

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa

(via flowerfood)

rhamphotheca:

Giant Pitcher Plant
Nepenthes macrophylla is a large carnivorous pitcher plant known only from the summit of Mount Trus Madi on the island of Borneo. This species is thought to be the most endangered highland Nepenthes of Borneo. It is threatened by habitat destruction and over-collecting for the international plant trade. More about this plant: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by hirosi SBM via Wikimedia Commons
Aug 25, 2013 / 274 notes

rhamphotheca:

Giant Pitcher Plant

Nepenthes macrophylla is a large carnivorous pitcher plant known only from the summit of Mount Trus Madi on the island of Borneo. This species is thought to be the most endangered highland Nepenthes of Borneo. It is threatened by habitat destruction and over-collecting for the international plant trade.

More about this plant: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by hirosi SBM via Wikimedia Commons

The egret flower (Habenaria radiate) is a terrestrial orchid native to the bogs of Japan.
Aug 25, 2013 / 17 notes

The egret flower (Habenaria radiate) is a terrestrial orchid native to the bogs of Japan.

Bluebells from Delaware
Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic
Aug 25, 2013 / 8 notes

Bluebells from Delaware

Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic

Aug 25, 2013 / 5 notes
My love for milkweed knows no bounds.
Aug 25, 2013 / 81 notes

My love for milkweed knows no bounds.

Aug 17, 2013 / 105 notes

Wild bergamot (Mondarda fistulosa), also called bee balm, is a wildflower in the mint family that grows throughout most of North America.

The USDA Plant Guide has this to say about its historical medicinal and culinary uses (forgive the occasional poor syntax and lack of Oxford commas): “The Tewa Indians because of the flavor it imparted cooked Wild bergamot with meat. The Iroquois used the plant in the making of a beverage. The plant has a wide variety of medicinal  uses. The Ojibwe put a wad of chewed leaves of this plant into their nostrils to relieve headache. The tops of the plant were dried and used as a sternutatory for  the relief of colds. The leaves were placed in warm water baths for babies. The Flambeau Ojibwe gathered and dried the whole plant, boiling it in a vessel to obtain the volatile oil to inhale to cure catarrh and bronchial affections. The Menomini also used this plant as a remedy for catarrh, steeping the leaves and inflorescences in a tea. The Meskwaki used this plant in combination with other plants to relieve colds. The Hocak (Winnebago) used wild bergamot in their sweat bath and inhaled the fumes to cure colds. A decoction of boiled leaves was used as a cure for eruptions on the face. The Cherokee made a warm poultice of the plant to relieve a headache. The Teton Dakota boiled together the leaves and flowers as a cure for abdominal pains. The Blackfoot made a tea from the blossoms and leaves to cure stomach pains. They also applied boiled leaves to the pustules of acne. The Tewa dried the plant and ground it into a powder that was rubbed over the head to cure headaches, over the body to cure fever, and as a remedy for sore eyes and colds. Early white settlers used it as a diaphoretic and carminative, and occasionally employed it for the relief of flatulent colic, nausea and vomiting.

Source: http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_mofi.pdf

Electron microscope image of chlorophyll in a tomato plant. 
Source: http://digitalcollections.stlawu.edu/collections/microscopy/tomato-plant-solanum-lycopersicum-0
Aug 16, 2013 / 16 notes

Electron microscope image of chlorophyll in a tomato plant.


Source: http://digitalcollections.stlawu.edu/collections/microscopy/tomato-plant-solanum-lycopersicum-0