plants

The Latest

Dec 2, 2013
flowerfood:

tricyrtis close-up on Flickr.
Aug 28, 2013 / 24 notes
fuckyeahbotany:

Stapelia flavopurpurea
Aug 27, 2013 / 204 notes
Black radishes! 
Seeds of Change has this to say about this curious heirloom: 
“Recently sighted on the shelves of specialty supermarkets, this nearly forgotten heirloom black radish has a nutty, mildly spicy flavor and dense white flesh that holds up well in recipes. It is best grown from late winter to early spring and is a healthy spring tonic vegetable.”
Hooray for heirlooms!
http://www.seedsofchange.com/quickfacts.aspx?c=9668&cat=177#ad-image-ProductDetail1_aFirstImage
Aug 27, 2013 / 2 notes

Black radishes!

Seeds of Change has this to say about this curious heirloom:

Recently sighted on the shelves of specialty supermarkets, this nearly forgotten heirloom black radish has a nutty, mildly spicy flavor and dense white flesh that holds up well in recipes. It is best grown from late winter to early spring and is a healthy spring tonic vegetable.”

Hooray for heirlooms!

http://www.seedsofchange.com/quickfacts.aspx?c=9668&cat=177#ad-image-ProductDetail1_aFirstImage

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN
Aug 27, 2013 / 397 notes

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN

(via flowerfood)

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 
Aug 26, 2013 / 206 notes

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 

(via mamisgarden)

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa
Aug 26, 2013 / 3,542 notes

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa

(via flowerfood)

rhamphotheca:

Giant Pitcher Plant
Nepenthes macrophylla is a large carnivorous pitcher plant known only from the summit of Mount Trus Madi on the island of Borneo. This species is thought to be the most endangered highland Nepenthes of Borneo. It is threatened by habitat destruction and over-collecting for the international plant trade. More about this plant: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by hirosi SBM via Wikimedia Commons
Aug 25, 2013 / 274 notes

rhamphotheca:

Giant Pitcher Plant

Nepenthes macrophylla is a large carnivorous pitcher plant known only from the summit of Mount Trus Madi on the island of Borneo. This species is thought to be the most endangered highland Nepenthes of Borneo. It is threatened by habitat destruction and over-collecting for the international plant trade.

More about this plant: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by hirosi SBM via Wikimedia Commons

The egret flower (Habenaria radiate) is a terrestrial orchid native to the bogs of Japan.
Aug 25, 2013 / 17 notes

The egret flower (Habenaria radiate) is a terrestrial orchid native to the bogs of Japan.

Bluebells from Delaware
Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic
Aug 25, 2013 / 8 notes

Bluebells from Delaware

Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic