plants

The Latest

Bluebells from Delaware
Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic
Aug 25, 2013 / 8 notes

Bluebells from Delaware

Source: Michael Melford, National Geographic

Aug 25, 2013 / 5 notes
My love for milkweed knows no bounds.
Aug 25, 2013 / 80 notes

My love for milkweed knows no bounds.

Aug 17, 2013 / 103 notes

Wild bergamot (Mondarda fistulosa), also called bee balm, is a wildflower in the mint family that grows throughout most of North America.

The USDA Plant Guide has this to say about its historical medicinal and culinary uses (forgive the occasional poor syntax and lack of Oxford commas): “The Tewa Indians because of the flavor it imparted cooked Wild bergamot with meat. The Iroquois used the plant in the making of a beverage. The plant has a wide variety of medicinal  uses. The Ojibwe put a wad of chewed leaves of this plant into their nostrils to relieve headache. The tops of the plant were dried and used as a sternutatory for  the relief of colds. The leaves were placed in warm water baths for babies. The Flambeau Ojibwe gathered and dried the whole plant, boiling it in a vessel to obtain the volatile oil to inhale to cure catarrh and bronchial affections. The Menomini also used this plant as a remedy for catarrh, steeping the leaves and inflorescences in a tea. The Meskwaki used this plant in combination with other plants to relieve colds. The Hocak (Winnebago) used wild bergamot in their sweat bath and inhaled the fumes to cure colds. A decoction of boiled leaves was used as a cure for eruptions on the face. The Cherokee made a warm poultice of the plant to relieve a headache. The Teton Dakota boiled together the leaves and flowers as a cure for abdominal pains. The Blackfoot made a tea from the blossoms and leaves to cure stomach pains. They also applied boiled leaves to the pustules of acne. The Tewa dried the plant and ground it into a powder that was rubbed over the head to cure headaches, over the body to cure fever, and as a remedy for sore eyes and colds. Early white settlers used it as a diaphoretic and carminative, and occasionally employed it for the relief of flatulent colic, nausea and vomiting.

Source: http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_mofi.pdf

Electron microscope image of chlorophyll in a tomato plant. 
Source: http://digitalcollections.stlawu.edu/collections/microscopy/tomato-plant-solanum-lycopersicum-0
Aug 16, 2013 / 16 notes

Electron microscope image of chlorophyll in a tomato plant.


Source: http://digitalcollections.stlawu.edu/collections/microscopy/tomato-plant-solanum-lycopersicum-0

flowerfood:

minneapolis chokeberries on Flickr.
"The chokeberries are attractive ornamental plants for gardens. Chokeberries are resistant to drought, insects, pollution, and disease. Several cultivars have been developed for garden planting, including A. arbutifolia ‘Brilliant’, selected for its striking fall leaf color, and A. melanocarpa ‘Viking’ and ‘Nero’, selected for larger fruit suitable for jam-making. Juice from these berries is astringent and not sweet, but high in vitamin C and antioxidants. The berries can be used to make wine or jam after cooking. Aronia is also used as a flavoring or colorant for beverages or yogurts.”
Aug 16, 2013 / 14 notes

flowerfood:

minneapolis chokeberries on Flickr.

"The chokeberries are attractive ornamental plants for gardens. Chokeberries are resistant to drought, insects, pollution, and disease. Several cultivars have been developed for garden planting, including A. arbutifolia ‘Brilliant’, selected for its striking fall leaf color, and A. melanocarpa ‘Viking’ and ‘Nero’, selected for larger fruit suitable for jam-making. Juice from these berries is astringent and not sweet, but high in vitamin C and antioxidants. The berries can be used to make wine or jam after cooking. Aronia is also used as a flavoring or colorant for beverages or yogurts.”

The best kind of dress.
Aug 16, 2013 / 14 notes

The best kind of dress.

So when I first heard the words “Botany 500,” I was like “ZOMG is that like a race for botanists???” I was pretty excited, because the idea of botanists (one of the classically nerdier types of scientist) engaged in some kind of derby or obstacle course (a steeplechase involving carnivorous plants and spiky succulents, mayhaps? ) really appeals to me. On so many levels. Alas, it isn’t - it’s a brand of men’s apparel. However, I was still intrigued. A line of organic three-piece suits? Or perhaps a cunning wardrobe for the oft-bespectacled botanist? Glorious either way. But, alas once more, Botany 500 has absolutely nothing to do with plants. However, Botany 500 provided Cary Grant’s suits for “North by Northwest,” so FUCK YEAH BOTANY 500.
Jul 20, 2013 / 4 notes

So when I first heard the words “Botany 500,” I was like “ZOMG is that like a race for botanists???” I was pretty excited, because the idea of botanists (one of the classically nerdier types of scientist) engaged in some kind of derby or obstacle course (a steeplechase involving carnivorous plants and spiky succulents, mayhaps? ) really appeals to me. On so many levels. Alas, it isn’t - it’s a brand of men’s apparel. However, I was still intrigued. A line of organic three-piece suits? Or perhaps a cunning wardrobe for the oft-bespectacled botanist? Glorious either way. But, alas once more, Botany 500 has absolutely nothing to do with plants. However, Botany 500 provided Cary Grant’s suits for “North by Northwest,” so FUCK YEAH BOTANY 500.

Jul 20, 2013 / 57 notes

Just another day in the garden!

Tribulus bud

 In this image captured by M. Reza Dadpour, the primordium (bud) of the weedy flower Tribulus sp. is shown at its final stages of development. More than 100 z-stacks were combined to produce the final image, which was captured using epillumination.

This image took 5th place at the Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging competition.

Source: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/photos/20-eye-opening-microscopic-images-from-the-olympus-biosca-0
Jul 3, 2013 / 52 notes
Tribulus bud
 In this image captured by M. Reza Dadpour, the primordium (bud) of the weedy flower Tribulus sp. is shown at its final stages of development. More than 100 z-stacks were combined to produce the final image, which was captured using epillumination.
This image took 5th place at the Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging competition.