plants

The Latest

Jun 16, 2014 / 1,474 notes

crystalqueerotter:

wire-man:

plants are weird.

*fucking awesome

(via curiousbotanicals)

Jun 2, 2014 / 712,181 notes

marigold-e-n:

sandflake:

I dearly wish that people would view their bodies as they view flowers…

Veins everywhere?

image

gorgeous~

Skin patches? Birthmarks?

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hella rad~

Scars? Stretch marks?

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beautiful~

Freckles? Moles? Acne scars?

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heckie yeah~

Large? Curvy?

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lovely~

Small? Thin?

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charming~

Missing a few pieces?

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handsome as ever~

Feel like you just look weird?

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you’re fantastic looking~

best thing i’ve seen in ages 

(via finnesotans)

Cross-section of leeks. 
Photo from this Buzzfeed post: http://www.buzzfeed.com/inteliq/stunning-views-inside-everyday-objects
Dec 3, 2013 / 43 notes

Cross-section of leeks.

Photo from this Buzzfeed post: http://www.buzzfeed.com/inteliq/stunning-views-inside-everyday-objects

Dec 2, 2013
flowerfood:

tricyrtis close-up on Flickr.
Aug 28, 2013 / 24 notes
fuckyeahbotany:

Stapelia flavopurpurea
Aug 27, 2013 / 209 notes
Black radishes! 
Seeds of Change has this to say about this curious heirloom: 
“Recently sighted on the shelves of specialty supermarkets, this nearly forgotten heirloom black radish has a nutty, mildly spicy flavor and dense white flesh that holds up well in recipes. It is best grown from late winter to early spring and is a healthy spring tonic vegetable.”
Hooray for heirlooms!
http://www.seedsofchange.com/quickfacts.aspx?c=9668&cat=177#ad-image-ProductDetail1_aFirstImage
Aug 27, 2013 / 2 notes

Black radishes!

Seeds of Change has this to say about this curious heirloom:

Recently sighted on the shelves of specialty supermarkets, this nearly forgotten heirloom black radish has a nutty, mildly spicy flavor and dense white flesh that holds up well in recipes. It is best grown from late winter to early spring and is a healthy spring tonic vegetable.”

Hooray for heirlooms!

http://www.seedsofchange.com/quickfacts.aspx?c=9668&cat=177#ad-image-ProductDetail1_aFirstImage

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN
Aug 27, 2013 / 400 notes

nybg:

brilliantbotany:

Boysenberries were created by crossing blackberries, loganberries (which are also a hybrid) and raspberries, giving boysenberries the scientific name Rubus ursinus x idaeus. The x in the name indicates that it is a hybrid. They’re named after Rudolph Boysen, the man who originally endeavored to create a new berry. Though Boysen was not the one to ultimately commericialize boysenberries, that was Walter Knott, they still bear his name. [x]

A California classic. As the story goes, a USDA employee by the name of George Darrow uncovered a few weak vines growing on Boysen’s old farm, the berries essentially abandoned after business struggles and a back injury drove Boysen to give up. Once Walter Knott replanted the vines on his own plot, it was Darrow who suggested they be called “Boysenberries.” And many a pie-lover has been thankful since. —MN

(via flowerfood)

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 
Aug 26, 2013 / 206 notes

wvoyh:

Giant skunk cabbage by Nobuhito Mochizuki 

(via mamisgarden)

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa
Aug 26, 2013 / 3,954 notes

terramantra:

 

This plant is Euphorbia obesa, a succulent from southern Africa

(via flowerfood)