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libutron:

Creeping Fuchsia - Fuchsia procumbens
Fuchsia procumbens (Myrtales - Onagraceae) is a species native to New Zealand naturally uncommon and is the smallest fuchsia in the world. It is strictly a coastal species found on sandy, gravelly or rocky places near the sea in the North Island.
The flowers are unusual for a fuchsia in that they are upright and yellow in color with red anthers and blue pollen. The flowers occur in September - May followed by edible red berries in early winter.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2010)
Aug 31, 2014 / 185 notes

libutron:

Creeping Fuchsia - Fuchsia procumbens

Fuchsia procumbens (Myrtales - Onagraceae) is a species native to New Zealand naturally uncommon and is the smallest fuchsia in the world. It is strictly a coastal species found on sandy, gravelly or rocky places near the sea in the North Island.

The flowers are unusual for a fuchsia in that they are upright and yellow in color with red anthers and blue pollen. The flowers occur in September - May followed by edible red berries in early winter.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2010)

(via botanicalperversion)

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.
The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).
Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.
Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.
Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)
Aug 24, 2014 / 555 notes

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical

Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.

The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).

Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.

Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.

Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

(via botanicalperversion)

steepravine:

Pink Monotropa Uniflora Bunch
(Ontonagon, Michigan - 8/2014)
Aug 18, 2014 / 201 notes

steepravine:

Pink Monotropa Uniflora Bunch

(Ontonagon, Michigan - 8/2014)

(via flowerfood)

rhamphotheca:

Um, so I think those trees are…
(via: I fucking love science)
Aug 18, 2014 / 970 notes

rhamphotheca:

Um, so I think those trees are…

(via: I fucking love science)

libutron:

Alpine eryngo - Eryngium alpinum
Easily recognizable and remarkable for its intense blue color, Eryngium alpinum (Apiaceae), is emblematic of the alpine flora. The species is native to Austria, Liechtenstein, Croatia, France, Switzerland, Italy, and Slovenia, but it is cultivated and has been observed to escape from gardens. 
The species is classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Other common names: Alpine sea holly, Queen of the Alps.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Mah Nava | Locality: Botanical Garden, Hamburg, Germany (2013)
Aug 15, 2014 / 125 notes

libutron:

Alpine eryngo - Eryngium alpinum

Easily recognizable and remarkable for its intense blue colorEryngium alpinum (Apiaceae), is emblematic of the alpine flora. The species is native to Austria, Liechtenstein, Croatia, France, Switzerland, Italy, and Slovenia, but it is cultivated and has been observed to escape from gardens. 

The species is classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Other common names: Alpine sea holly, Queen of the Alps.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Mah Nava | Locality: Botanical Garden, Hamburg, Germany (2013)

(via mamisgarden)

Some kind of Red Hot Poker (Kniphofia)
Aug 15, 2014 / 209 notes

Some kind of Red Hot Poker (Kniphofia)

(via flowerfood)

Aug 12, 2014 / 2 notes

Anonymous said: warning about cattails!! there are many poisonous look a likes so be careful! also they need to be prepared well since they take in or are covered by potentially infected water! not sure you or your followers would need this but it may be a life saver one day!

Got this anon message a looooong time ago and totally forgot to post it! References a post about edible cattails. Thank you, anon!

Jul 7, 2014 / 778 notes

(via mamisgarden)

Jul 1, 2014 / 4,196 notes

tardytulip:

Illegally touching cute succulents

Succulents can be fucking adorable

(via malkinisms)

Jun 25, 2014 / 1,142 notes

rhamphotheca:

wapiti3Spruce Cones, Alberta, Canada  (on Flickr)

YAAAAAAAS